Book Review: The Girl With The Louding Voice

Title: The Girl With The Louding Voice

Author: Abi Dare

Published By: Sceptre, an Imprint of Holder & Stroughton

Release Date: 2020

Genre: Coming-of-age, Fiction, Bildungsroman

Format: Paperback

Length: 312 pages

Synopsis

Adunni is a fourteen-year-old Nigerian Girl who knows what she wants: an education.

As the only daughter of a broke father, she is a valuable commodity. Removed from school and sold as a third wife to an old man, Adunni’s life amounts to this: four goats, two bags of rice, some chickens and a new TV. When unspeakable tragedy swiftly strikes in her new home, she is secretly sold as a domestic servant to a household in the wealthy enclaves of Lagos, where no one will talk about the strange disappearance of her predecessor, Rebecca. No one but Adunni…

As a yielding daughter, a subservient wife and a powerless servant, Adunni is repeatedly told that she is nothing. But Adunni won’t be silenced. She is determined to find her voice- in a whisper, in song, in broken English- until she can speak for herself, for the girls like Rebecca, who came before, and for all the girls who will follow.

Review

This book was a lovely read for me. As a Nigerian, I could totally relate to the deep themes inherent in the book which were explored beautifully.

It was very warm and heart-felt and with a powerful message!

I loved the plot and the sequence of events as told in the book and felt it was a great effort. I also loved the writing style and the fact that the first part was written in broken english  and the first person POV (even if that required some level of patience on my part as I speak broken english slowly). It was my first experience reading such a book.

All in all, a lovely read. A lovely ending but would have not been surprised if it ended another way because that is the reality in Nigeria when it comes to child abuse and child labour.

Watch my full review on this lovely book by clicking on the video below:

Book Review: Tomorrow Died Yesterday

Title: Tomorrow Died Yesterday

Author: Chimeka Garricks

Published By: Paperworth Books Limited

Release Date: 2010

Genre: Fiction

Format: Paperback

Length: 292 pages

Synopsis

It’s 2004 Port Harcourt at the height of the kidnap of oil workers in the Niger Delta, a kidnapping goes awry and four lives are reconnected. Done (aka Doughboy) the career militant responsible for the crime. Amaibi the gentle university professor / eco – warrior accused. Kaniye the lawyer themed restauranteur who tries to get him off and Tubo an amoral oil company executive.

Against a backdrop of corrupt practices, failed systems and injustice, these four friends tell the story of oil in a region and its effects on local communities and the Nigerian larger society.

Review

DEBUT NOVEL WHATTTT??

This book was purely exceptional and I totally enjoyed it! I thought it was a great effort from the author especially as a debut novel.

I loved the deep exploration of the characters through the writing style of first person narrative as told from the four major characters. The author found a way to endear the characters into the hearts of readers no matter w villainous their characters may appear to be.

I also loved the fact that deep themes which are prevalent in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria were explored in depth. Such themes like corruption, violence, oil bunkering, gas flaring and the effect of such on native communities within that region.

As a lawyer and legal practitioner, I absolutely loved Kaniye’a character and the legal thriller aspect of this book. Whoa!

Watch the full review on this lovely book by clicking the link below:

Book Review: I’m Telling The Truth But I’m Lying

Title: I’m Telling The Truth But I’m Lying

Author: Bassey Ikpi

Published By: Harper Perennial

Release Date: 2019

Genre: Memoir, Non-fiction

Format: Paperback

Length: 248 pages

Synopsis

In this remarkable memoir-in-essays, Basset Ikpi explores her life-as a Nigerian American immigrant, a black woman, a slam poet, a daughter, an artist – through the lens of her mental health and diagnoses of bipolar II and anxiety.

In I’m Telling the Truth but I’m Lying, Bassey Ikpi breaks open our understanding of mental health by giving us intimate access to her own. Exploring shame. Confusion, medication and family in the process, Bassey looks at how mental health impacts every aspect of our lives- how we appear to others. and most important to ourselves – and challenges our preconceptions about what it means to be “normal”. Viscerally raw and honest. The result is an exploration of the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of who we are – and the ways, as honest as we try to be, each of these stories is also a lie.

Review

Whoosh!

Where do I start from?

Hands Down one of the most beautiful books I have ever read in a long while! Such honesty and openness that the author exhibited in penning this work of art.

As a mental health advocate, I loved the book because it highlighted certain conversations that should be had in Nigeria on mental health. Through Bassey Ikpi’s eyes, readers are able to understand what someone who goes through anxiety and bipolar disorder feels.

I recommend for every Nigerian, mental health advocate, Nigerians with mental health issues and everyone dealing with Biplolar II and/or anxiety (whether or not you know what it’s called).

I had the pleasure and honor of interviewing Bassey Ikpi and loved every second of it!From her book to mental health issues to Bassey’s journey with Bipolar II and Anxiety to Motherhood and mental health awareness in Nigeria, we had an amazing time discussing the book!

Watch the full book review and my interview with Bassey Ikpi by clicking the links below:

Book Review: Unfolding Grace

I did a book review on the lovely read, Unfolding Grace by Kikelomo Kuponiyi.

I typically do not read a lot of christian fiction because religion generally tends to be very sensitive and each individual has their own unique way of expressing his/her/their religion in the way they understand it best and for writers, this may shine through in their writing. I also try to be protective of what I read or what I take into my mind, as much as I try to keep an open mind generally.

This book was a nice read and I loved the fact that although the book was close to 400 pages, the prints were big and I finished it in about 2 days! As much as I did not agree with some of the religious views and interpretations of certain religious view points, the book was all in all, an easy and nice read with a didactic feel.

If you’re looking for a nice Nigerian Christian Fiction recommendation, you can check this out!

Enjoy my book review on the book, Unfolding Grace! ✨

MY FIRST AUTHOR INTERVIEW! WHOOP!💃🏽I INTERVIEWED BASSEY IKPI💃🏽

Okay I’m super excited about this. Can you tell?

I had the pleasure and honor of interviewing Bassey Ikpi, the author of the beautiful book, I’m Telling The Truth But I’m Lying and loved every second of it! I had previously done a book review of the book (which you can watch here) and the author commented on my youtube channel saying we could do a Q n A. Needless to say, I almost fainted from pure excitement!

From her book to mental health issues to Bassey’s journey with Bipolar II and Anxiety to Motherhood and mental health awareness in Nigeria, we had an amazing time discussing the book! Bassey was so open, real and honest in answering my questions!

I’m Telling The Truth But I’m Lying is such an amazing book that I recommend for every Nigerian, mental health advocate, Nigerians with mental health issues and everyone dealing with Biplolar II and/or anxiety.

You can watch the full interview by clicking on the video below.

Book Review: A Broken People’s Playlist

Ahhh….this book was absolutely beautiful! It broke my heart in so many ways.

I loved my reading experience while reading this book (as it was deeply infused with music) and loved how each story was beautiful in its on way.

Although the collection of short stories is fictional, some of the stories felt very real and relatable to me. I like how the stories were independent yet some were linked to each other in an interesting way! This is an interesting one if you’re looking for an African collection of short stories.

Watch my review of this book by Chimeka Garricks up in my YouTube channel!

JUN-LY BOOK HAUL (OR THE BOOKS I BOUGHT AND RECEIVED IN JUNE AND JULY)

Hi guys!

SO I’ve been on a social media/youtube break for a couple of weeks; taking time to just refresh and rest. I am excited to be back bringing you book-ish content!

Today, I share the books I bought and received in the months of June and July or as I call it, my JUNLY Book Haul!

Enjoy!

Book Review: The Farm and Other Stories

Title: The Farm and Other Stories

Author: Adesuwa Iluobe

Published By: First published by the author under a pseudonym, Satayaa

Release Date: 2017

Genre: Fiction

Format: Paperback

Length: 174 pages

Synopsis

In a rustic part of Nigeria, an unusual farm records uncommon success and productivity in its operations. Separated from her loved ones, Moremi is flung into an unfamiliar world that is highly expectant of her. Amidst fatal changes, bizarre alliances, the quest for wealth and love, she finds an unlikely friend in Ugonna. Together they must do their part to ensure the continued success of the Farm. With each choice they make, their lives unfold before them until they stumble upon a shattering revelation that unsettles what little balance there is at the Farm.

Review

We selected this book as our read at The Readers’ Hub Book Club for the month of June 2020. The author of the book is a member of our book club so we were honoured to have read her book and reviewed same in her presence.

The book is divided into four stories with “The Farm” being the major story. Without giving too much away, the Farm gives an in-depth expose into baby making factory which poses as a typical farm to outsiders. The story delves into the lives of women who have found themselves, by different means, in a baby making factory in eastern Nigeria. Some of these women are held against their will, raped continuously by members of a gang and are obligated to bear children which are in turn sold to affluent members of the society.

The other stories in the book tell gripping and heart-wrenching stories of love birds torn apart in the most disastrous of circumstances common in Northern Nigeria and young women who are given away as child brides and made to bear children even though they are as young as 12.

This book is truly one of a kind. I do not think I have read anything quite like it.

I honestly did not know what to expect when I picked up this book because I had not read anything else by the author. I am happy to say that I was not disappointed. I loved the way the author used fictional stories to explore and shine a light on really deep societal themes and issues that plague Nigeria as a whole from baby factories to child brides and the effect of having children at really young ages to insecurity, death and the negative impacts of terrorism in Northern Nigeria.

In my opinion, the book is a great attempt at personalising the accounts of victims of some of these heinous and life-changing activities happening around us in every day life. As human beings, it is easy to hear some of these issues on the local news or look at certain individuals as mere statistics, but often times than not, we fail to understand deeply, and cannot even begin to relate to the negative impact these activities have on human beings living in these areas in Nigeria. This book is one of such exposes into the ordinary lives of those we often classify as statistics.

The writing style of the author was simple. and easy to understand. While most of the book was told in. the third person narrative, one of the. stories was told in the first person narrative, giving it a much more personal feel. And the plot twists??? Whoosh! I loved the plot twists in The Farm (which had me screaming “ewwwooo” at some point, because I”m randomly. extra like that). I commend the author for a job well done on that.

Although I felt the end of The Farm was a little rushed and I would have preferred the other stories to have been longer (for purely selfish reasons), I thoroughly enjoyed the book. It. was a huge eye-opener for me and I enjoyed discussing it at our book club meet for the month of May 2020. I recommend!

Verdict

A strong 8/10 from me.

P.S. I spoke about The Farm and Other Stories in my “Maypril” wrap up. Watch below:

Book Review: On Ajayi Crowther Street

Title: On Ajayi Crowther Street by Elnathan John and illustrated by Alaba Onajin

If you are looking for a lighthearted, funny comic-strip book read, then this book is for you!

I loved this book because I literally finished it in one sitting and it made me laugh. It is comedic in nature but filled with deep themes that are so relatable to the Nigerian society. I loved the way the author explored these themes and gave the book a lighthearted read in all.

It is such a great book to learn from!

You’d be surprised at my rating for this book! 😳😝

Check out my book review on this lovely book on my YouTube Channel! Let me know what you think about it if you’ve read!

Book Review: Children of Blood and Bone

Title: Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

Wow.

Wow.

Wow.

This book was simply unputdownable!! I do not know where to start!

I loved the intentionality behind every word, every phrase, every sentence and every chapter! Amazing writing skill at its best from Tomi Adeyemi and I loved discussing my views on this book! I felt like I was in a great movie while reading and her use of imagery was second to none!

I cannot wait to read the second instalment!

Watch my review of this amazing book on my YouTube channel!!!